Co-Parenting: Its not just for Divorced Families

Co-Parenting is important for all families whether divorced or together

When we talk about co-parenting its often thought of as two divorced or separated parents working together to parent their children. You hear it in the courtroom when the judge rules on child custody matters; you hear it in the counseling room, at the children’s school during parent teacher conferences. BUT, what if we expanded that. All too often parents that live in the home together aren’t even on the same page with parenting issues. Or what about parents that are married but one parent travels for work and is rarely home. These couples need to learn the art of co-parenting also, yet no one will ever even mention the idea to them because they aren’t divorced.

Applying the concept of co-parenting teams to married couples is helpful, especial in the military communities when one parent is in and out of the house. So often the spouse on the home-front feels the brunt of parenting responsibility and the service member feels guilty for their lack of presence in their children’s lives whether because of deployment, TDY, field time, whatever. The home front parent feels like the disciplinarian, fun sucker etc. And the more absent parent spoils the children with gifts, rarely punishes, and is the more lax parent (of course this is not always the case, but the general pattern). This creates two different set of operations for the children to follow, and creates chaos in the house as the children try to figure out which set of rules they need to operate under at any given minute.
Parents should be a co-parenting team, discussing how they plan to raise their children, and the expectations they have for one another as a parenting team and for their children before having a family. Having these types of discussions early and often can eliminate stress and anger down the road. So what does it mean to be a co-parenting team? Here are some basic guidelines on what it means to be a co-parenting team, regardless of whether or not you are still married.

How to Co-Parent Effectively:

Consistency is King!

Regardless of anything else consistency will win out; the moment you give in, you have taught your children that if they whine and complain hard enough, you will give them what they want. If you say “no” and your spouse says “yes”, they will play ya’ll against each other. Stay consistent personally and as a team. You and your spouse are a team you can’t be in charge of the kids if you are squabbling amongst yourselves.

Don’t let one Parent always be the Disciplinarian.

Don’t let one parent always be the disciplinarian. I know this isn’t always possible when one parent is gone a lot, but when they are present make sure the workload is fully shared, this means disciplining as well. The kids will see a united front if the responsibility is split. This also applies to showing affection towards your children, both parents should be responsible for showing physical, verbal, and emotional affection towards their children. You’d hate to be labeled as the cold one while your children constantly turn to your spouse for affection.

Don’t tolerate it when your Children Play you Against Each Other

Do not EVER tolerate it when your children play you against one another. I remember I did that once as a child, and let me tell you once was enough! They made it clear that they would not tolerate me playing them against each other. It does not matter what discipline plan you and your partner choose, along as it is agreed upon.

 Conclusion:

These three points are broad, but purposefully so. No family has the same experiences and circumstances. Because it is a broad overview it can be applied to any two parent family in any circumstance. Remember, no matter what you and your spouse are a team. Teams work better when they work together (I know that sounds cliché but, it’s entirely too true). Having a strong co-parenting team  tension and stress within your marital relationship will be reduced. Making your marriage even stronger!

Military parents, I know how hard co-parenting can be when one parent is home only a small percentage of the time. Service members are out of the home so much for trainings, deployments, field time, or maybe you opted to be a part while a child finishes school. This can be hard, and even confusing for some children when one parent is still an authority, but not home the majority of the time. If this is something you struggle with in your home hop over to my Military Parenting Page and check out my program coming soon: Parenting Coaching Designed specifically for Military Parents to address the unique concerns that we face with our children. Take a moment and sign up for updates and receive a FREE GIFT: Behavior Chart & an Easy How to Guide for Promoting Positive Behavior in our children.



Co-Parenting: It is not just for divorced families

15 thoughts on “Co-Parenting: Its not just for Divorced Families

  1. I am not a military family, but I am a divorced (and re-married) mom. I have a wonderful co-parenting relationship with my kids father, as well as with my husband. It makes life so much easier! This is a great post 🙂

  2. Great article! My hubby and I were just talking about co-parenting last night. We are currently in a parenting small group at church that talks about points.

  3. Having a parenting plan and discipline strategy is absolutely key especially when you’re still married, assuming you want to stay that way and present a healthy marriage to your children! I’ve learned to always try to talk parenting with my husband outside of earshot of the kiddos and when we’re both calm. We can discuss our ideas best when its hypothetical and not in the heat of the moment. Great topic!

    1. Jen, Yes having a plan makes it so much easier, rgardless of whether we are married or not, that is why co-parenting is for married couples as well! I also think its great that you talk out of earshot of the kids when it comes to parenting!

  4. I totally agree that it takes both parents. My sister and I definitely used it to our advantage that my mom was the disciplinarian.

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